Entertainment Systems

 

Entertainment systems play an increasingly larger role in our households and can account for up to 15% of our total power consumption. Equipment with high energy efficiency ratings can help save electricity even when turned off, while maintaining features like clock displays, channel settings and remote control functions.

Types of Entertainment Systems

Media Players

Media players range in complexity from single-function models—like a blu-ray machine, for example—to multi-purpose devices that can play your favorite music as effortlessly as they showcase your latest home videos or vacation photos. Their options, features and price vary depending on manufacturer and model. When purchasing a media player, up its value by investing in an energy-efficient model.

Types of Media Players

Audio Players

Audio players range from smaller, less-complex devices to whole-house systems with automated controls and wall-mounted, multiple-room surround sound. Most are designed to play audio files of varying formats, such as streaming audio, digital audio, CDs (Compact Discs), DVD (Digital Versatile Disc)-audio, HDCD (High Definition Compatible Digital) and SACDs (Super Audio Compact Discs).

Blu-Ray Players

A blu-ray Disc (BD) player reads and displays audio-visual media, like movies and videos, saved in a file format bearing the same name. Due to the greater audio and video definition they provide, blu-ray players have surpassed their DVD (Digital Video Disc) counterparts in both performance and popularity. ENERGY-STAR® qualified models offer all the latest blu-ray technology and features but are up to 60%* more efficient and—when not operating—consume as little as one quarter of the energy of standard units.

* Source: ENERGY STAR® -www.energystar.gov

DVD players

A DVD—or Digital Video Disc or Digital Versatile Disc—player reads and displays audio-visual media, like movies and videos, saved in a file format bearing the same name. ENERGY-STAR® qualified models offer all the latest DVD technology and features but are up to 60%* more efficient and—when not operating—consume as little as one quarter of the energy of standard units.

* Source: ENERGY STAR® -www.energystar.gov

DVRs

A DVR (Digital Video Recorder), as the name indicates, records video in a digital format. Most often supplied as part of a television subscription service—like cable, broadband or satellite TV—DVRs save recorded material to a hard drive, memory card, flash drive or mass storage device. In some cases, the DVR is linked to a direct-to-disk recording facility.

While convenient for entertainment, a DVR consumes energy.

So, to save money and energy, unplug your DVR when you’re not using it, or consider investing in aor, which—in addition to providing surge protection—enables you to control power to multiple devices from a single switch.


Televisions

Recent studies estimate that 10% of the average household’s power is consumed by TV-related activity. The TV is now the center of so many other “multi-media” pursuits—playing video games, watching movies, streaming videos, surfing the Internet and more. Fortunately, there are ways to up your TV’s energy efficiency without lowering its entertainment value.

The three factors that affect a TV’s energy efficiency are size, type and settings. The bigger the screen, the more power it uses; thus, a smaller TV will have a lower impact on your electric bill. If you really want that 52-inch model, though, you can help offset its higher energy consumption by investing in an LCD instead of a Plasma model. LCD TVs use about two to three times less electricity than Plasmas. Whatever size and type of TV you own—LCD, Plasma, projection or tube—you can heighten your energy savings by lowering its brightness setting. This small change can decrease your TV’s energy consumption by 50% while still enabling you to enjoy great picture quality.